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Issue No 8 ,
May 2018
 
  Published by Dar Assayad Arab Defence Journal
Highlights   المعلوماتية العسكرية تكنولوجيا الدفاع حول العالم العالم العربي تحديث السلاح الافتتاحية رسالة الناشر
Highlights
EYES IN THE SKY
One of the most important air assets available to force commanders in the 21st Century is the airborne electronic warfare aircraft. These modern platforms come in all shapes and sizes and can be extensively fitted out with sensors, mission systems and on-board displays, as well as comprehensive, secure communications systems and data-links, including satellite communications. Electronic Warfare can include Signals and Communications Intelligence (SIGINT and COMINT) with specialised multi-frequency radio equipment to monitor, jam and re-transmit hostile communications. Other specialist roles include Airborne Early Warning (AEW) of hostile air movements, with Command and Control (C2) capabilities which allow the aircraft to act as the flying command post, directing friendly aircraft to targets beyond the radar range of their own fighter radars. In the C2 role they can also provide an area air traffic control (ATC) service, helping to avoid conflicting air movements within a busy tactical area of operations and also providing interim ATC facilities for civil air movements in an emergency, such as where a natural event (as in a hurricane or earthquake) might have destroyed normal surface radars and ATC ground stations.
There are also smaller tactical EW platform aircraft that can provide covert electronic and electro-optical visual surveillance for governments in support of anti-terrorist activities or to provide additional police and homeland defence capabilities over potential high value targets or special high-profile events. The latest synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems can provide high definition images of surface areas, and can also be programmed within mission systems to seek out and track suspicious ground movements. Monitoring mobile telephone communications and tracking their use is also becoming more important in counter-terror operations.
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RECONNAISSANCE VEHICLES
Putting eyes on the enemy has long been the traditional battlefield role of reconnaissance forces. Getting accurate intelligence on the position and movement of enemy forces is essential to allow commanders to make accurate plans, both in defence and attack.
Securing that intelligence is not easy. Reconnaissance forces have to work hard to find out what the enemy is up to. There are two main ways of doing this: first, by guile and stealth. This involves reconnaissance troops covertly approaching the enemy to set up surveillance of their positions and movements. If reconnaissance troops come under attack then they need to have the speed and mobility to rapidly escape, live to fight another day.
The second approach is to fight for intelligence by providing reconnaissance troops with protection and firepower to look after themselves if they come under attack.
The Light Reconnaissance Vehicle (LRV) 600 developed by Supacat is aimed at providing this capability to armies. It is based on the chassis of the Land Rover Discovery. The automotive systems on the base platform have been retained and modified for military applications. The lightweight vehicle offers a unique flexibility, allowing the users to convert it into either 4_4 or 6_6 platforms according to their mission requirements
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المواضيع الاكثر قراءة
HIGHLIGHTS
EYES IN THE SKY
One of the most important air assets available to force commanders in the 21st Century is the airborne electronic warfare aircraft. These modern platforms come in all shapes and sizes and can be extensively fitted out with ...
<< read more